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Ask the OB - Commonly asked questions



Jed Turk of Health Quest Medical Practice answers 6 commonly asked questions

“Most patients, but not all, can deliver vaginally after they have had a prior cesarean section.”

Dr. Jed Turk has been practicing obstetrics and gynecology in the Hudson Valley for 20 years. He has offered answers to some of the common questions women have asked.

Should I VBAC? 

This stands for Vaginal Birth after Cesarean. Most patients, but not all, can deliver vaginally after they have had a prior cesarean section. The first step in making this decision is finding out from your physician if you have any reason why you must be delivered by cesarean. If not, the choice should be yours. Both a repeat cesarean section and VBAC are safe for both you and your baby, but each one does have certain risks. If you have a successful VBAC, your recovery will be much easier compared to a repeat cesarean.

Can I dye my hair during pregnancy? 

Yes, dying your hair is safe while pregnant. Keep in mind, however, that many pregnant women report thinning hair during pregnancy as well as brittle hair and split ends so you may not want to invest a lot of time or money into your hair until sometime after delivery.

How much weight should I gain? 

There is no magic answer to this question but 20-30 pounds is usually a fair range. Generally speaking, women who tend to be overweight should gain less than those who are slender but there is no particular target you should aim for. It is best to eat when you are hungry but eat healthy. Avoid junk food and be careful with what you snack on. Don't let anyone convince you that you are "eating for two".

When do I need to stop working? 

When you stop working mostly depends on what you do and where you work, unless your physician recommends you take off from work due to a medical or obstetrical issue For example, someone who works at a desk can often work until she goes into labor. Others who work as police officers, or other very physical jobs, may need to stop working sooner if their pregnancy prevents them from fulfilling their job requirements. The time of your commute may need to be factored into this decision, especially if towards the end of your pregnancy you can work from home on a PC.

When should I feel my baby move? 

Most patients start to feel the baby move at about the halfway point in pregnancy (20 weeks). Some will notice this a little earlier, and first time moms may not detect movement until almost 22 weeks. Babies don't move all day long as they do sleep in the uterus. Movement often slows down during the last few weeks of pregnancy and you may start to feel squirming movements instead of kicks. If at any point you think the movement is too slow or not detectable speak to your physician.

Is sex safe during pregnancy? 

For most patients, and with most pregnancies, sex is safe throughout the pregnancy. You should stop having sex if at any point it is no longer comfortable or if your physician advises against it. Reasons not to have sex may include having a placenta previa, a weak cervix, or premature labor. Sometimes you may notice some vaginal bleeding during or after having sex; although this is common, you should notify your physician if this happens.

Jed Turk, Board Certified OBGYN, sees patients in HQMP’s OB/GYN Poughkeepsie and Fishkill offices. He delivers at Vassar Brothers Medical Center.



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