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Winter safety tips for kids



Mittens are just the beginning

Winter safety tips for kids


Spring and early summer 2020 were like winter in some ways, with a lot of hunkering down inside, huddled around screens, all with the idea of protection. Even as Covid-19 numbers dropped, and children were once again able to play a bit out of doors, restrictions still held, with distance learning, zoom visits, remaining a big part of the picture. Now, with actual winter upon us, kids who’ve already been cooped up more than any generation in history are really, really going to need to get outside. And according to experts, outdoor play remains the safest play. How to do it all safely?

Beth Turner at Parents.com has some helpful tips, some tried-and-true, some newfangled.  In short: layering, skincare, and hydration. These are the key three.

The age of fleece, polypropylene, and other synthetic fabrics has brought layering to a whole new level. It was not that long ago (m childhood and young adulthood) that cotton, flannel, and wool – all of which retain moisture – were the main options. Synthetic fabrics are perfect for a snug base layer over which to layer organic fabrics, over which another moisture wicking fabric is best. Socks, waterproof mittens, and especially an ear-covering hat  – also critical.

READ MORE: This will be the winter of outside play

Turner is adamant about protecting your child’s skin. She advises baths – in which more H2O is absorbed – moisturizers, lip balms, a humidifier and sunscreen. She has some innovative ideas regarding ever-important hydration, like herbal teas, drinkable yogurt, soups, and hot chocolate.

I have personally watched in awe as children play in the cold without proper clothing, and they seem fine, joyous even. I’m talking no coat, no hat, no hand covering, sometimes no socks. In the snow, laughing, red-cheeked. Adorable. Therein is the double edged sword of play – a child can become so engrossed, they can get hypothermia or frostbite without knowing it.

If you’re the one on watch, Turner advises: “Give them a ten-minute warning if they develop rosy cheeks, a runny nose, or complaints of cold fingers or toes. Also bring them inside soon if their hands and feet are clearly wet. Once they’re out of the cold, remove wet clothing. Have them move about and drink a hot beverage to raise their body temperature.”

A little mindful parenting regarding winter play can go a long way to preventing any mishaps or undue discomfort.



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