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Teaching your kids life skills



Five suggestions for these pandemic days

Five suggestions for teaching your kids life skills


A balanced life requires practical skills, not just the academic learning kids get in school. Mothering.com suggests teaching children these five important life skills. They can be introduced slowly and adapted to any age level.

Growing food

Shopping in a supermarket disconnects us from an awareness of where food really comes from. Gardening not only teaches responsibility and science but also helps kids understand the difference between whole and processed foods. Even if you don't have a back yard with room for a garden, you can start seeds in the house and transplant seedlings to pots. Hands-on experience is engaging and eating food you've grown is one of life's great satisfactions.

Cooking from scratch

By the time they leave home, kids should know how to cook so they won't resort to lots of junk food. Small children can wash and sort vegetables. Older kids can chop vegetables, and they can learn how to choose spices and follow recipes. Like growing food, cooking food brings the pleasure of tasting the product of their efforts and teaches the delights of wholesome eating.

Managing money

It's easy for college students to be drawn into debt by credit card offers if they haven't learned a sense of monetary responsibility. You can start by explaining your decisions whether to buy certain items, or by comparing prices at the supermarket. It's fine to tell kids you can't afford a particular purchase, so they know there are limits on spending. An allowance gives kids a chance to manage their own money, make financial decisions, and see the consequences.

 

Organizing a room

Some kids are naturally neat, but even the naturally sloppy ones can learn how to tidy up and appreciate the convenience of being able to find what they need, when they need it. Don't expect a consistently neat bedroom but take the time now and then to show your child how to clean up and how keep possessions organized.

Managing time

Our busy lives can become chaotic without some form of organization as well. Make a daily and/or a weekly schedule for the family and write it out on a whiteboard so your kids can see what to expect, prepare for future events and learn how scheduling can help them manage their time.



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