Stay safe on the streets



Bike safety rules to remember

family bike safety

Safe New York

 

Remember, before you buy your child a bike, they will need to learn to ride! Bike New York offers classes on bike safety and for learning how to ride, but if you can’t attend a class, you can learn an easy method from this video at Bike New York.

 

Another safety organization in New York is Safe Routes to School. Safe Routes to School programs enable community leaders, schools and parents across the United States to improve safety and encourage more children, including children with disabilities, to safely walk and bicycle to school.

 

In the process, programs are working to reduce traffic congestion and improve health and the environment, making communities more livable for everyone. Call Safe Routes to School Program Coordinator, Greg Hart at
845-431-5724 for more information on Hudson Valley Safe Route events.


Don't forget helmet safety!

 

Does my child really need one?

 

The simple answer is yes. Laws now require helmets in many areas. That is because medical research shows that a bicycle helmet can prevent 85% of cyclists’ head injuries. Wearing a bike helmet is one way to help prevent these injuries. Before you even start looking for a bike for your child make sure you find them a helmet first. Here are some helpful helmet tips:

 

  • Fashion Forward – Choose your child’s favorite color (this will encourage them to wear the helmet.)
  • Bright Lights – While you’re at it, buy an easily noticeable color and proper reflective gear for early evening rides.
  • Small, yet mighty – Find the smallest size helmet that fits your child’s head.
  • Certified – Make sure the helmet has a Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), The Snell Memorial Foundation, or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) certification sticker on the inside for authenticity.
  • Snug and Safe Fit – Adjust the straps so that your helmet is level from front to back, just above the top of your eyebrows, with little room for movement. The straps should meet just under each ear, at your jaw. Buckle the strap. Then open your mouth wide.
  • The chin strap should feel fairly tight. It may take a few minutes to get the adjustment right the first time. Your helmet may need to be readjusted every once in a while–the straps may loosen with use, for instance. Be sure to check it regularly.