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Scholastic Book Fairs go virtual



Support your school! Buy some great books for your kid.

Scholastic Book Fairs go virtual

Scholastic Publishing realizes that a lot has changed for families this year, but one source of magic parents can continue to count on to fill their kids with joy is the Scholastic Book Fair

Remember the anticipation you felt as a kid on a crisp fall morning? The excitement you and your classmates couldn’t contain on the short walk to the school library? The thrill of looking around a room full of displays featuring the latest Goosebumps, cool pens, bookmarks, and funky erasers you couldn’t wait to buy? The unbridled joy of reading a new book—that you chose yourself!—for the first time? 

Brand new drive-through, virtual, and revamped in-person Scholastic Book Fairs options are being held each day in communities across the country, helping parents ensure that their kids still get to experience the best day of the school year, whether they are learning remotely or in person. Get free shipping on purchases of $25 or more. 

Families can safely visit a Scholastic Book Fair—either at school or from the comfort of their home—and shop a wide and diverse selection of great books for every age group and reading level, while also supporting their school community in the process. Schools get 25% rebate to use for purchase of books for their school. 

Helping You Raise a Reader Through Access and Choice

In the past Scholastic brought books directly to your child's school. Now with Covid-19 and dealing with safe contact, you now can buy books online, and it is credited to your school. 

Scholastic publishes books in every genre for all ages and reading levels—plus expert parenting guides to support literacy at home. You can search for books by price, by interest based on age or by theme. 

Discover Characters That Captivate Young Readers
Find your kid's favorites—from classics to new characters—one at a time or as a series.

Books ship free for orders of $25 or more. Plus every order earns your child's school 25% which they can use to purchase books for your child's class.

Scholastic has a book for every age and reading level, from illustrated classics to award-winning chapter books — plus, expert parenting advice to support literacy at home.

Check out these lists on their site:
Book Lists & Recommendations - books recommended by age plus tips and strategies for parents to encourage their kids to read

Activities & Printables - lots of fun activities and printables to keep the kids engaged and entertained

Raise a Reader Blog - learn about great read-aloud books, tips for parents, when to start chapter books and more
 
Learning to Read Opens New Worlds of Confidence
Ooka Island is an adaptive, game-based learn to read program that develops strong early reading skills through 24 levels of educational activities and 85 ebooks. You can sign up for a free trial here.

Look for your school book fair here

Visit Scholastic:




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