Preparing for a spike… or a surge



If and when COVID-19 numbers go way up

If and when COVID-19 numbers go way up


Although active Covid-19 case numbers are better in the Hudson Valley than in most parts of the country, they are, on average, increasing in most of our neighborhoods at present. In the Midwest and Mountain West, things are particularly bad, and hospitals are overwhelmed, not unlike New York City in March and April. Here, thankfully, not so much, although the official word, as reported by Christina Caron of the New York Times, is everyone needs to be ready for what experts are calling “the third peak” of coronavirus.

For us, that surge may not transpire as predicted. As Dr. Sean O’Leary, vice chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ committee on infectious diseases, says, “There is some reason for hope that it won’t be horrible. But I think we don’t really know.”

Regardless, the inevitable anxiety over the possibility alone can be a problem. Caron  offers some proactive tips that will, at the very least, give you some sense of control, and could indeed be lifesaving.

READ MORE: A sick kid in the time of COVID

First and foremost, she and the vast majority of health professionals advocate getting both yourself and your kids vaccinated, particularly for the flu. Also, if your child is attending on-site school, create a backup plan in case the school shuts down again.

Once again, a pro is advising parents to go easy on themselves, especially if they are single. The Child Mind Institute in New York City, offers advice on its website for single parents on how to mindfully manage child care, employment and the pandemic, but the tips are useful for all.

As Caron puts it: “Set the parenting bar lower. It’s OK if your child is getting more screen time than usual or your go-to lunch has become quesadillas.”

READ MORE: Coping, confidence, and coronavirus

She goes on to give helpful tips on prioritizing your family’s mental health for the months ahead by “implementing structure and routines” for your child.

“Stick to consistent bedtimes and mealtimes. Even simple routines like getting dressed every morning can offer much-needed structure. Weekly activities like pizza night or movie night can give the whole family something to look forward to.”

Practicing mindfulness and exhibiting it for your kids is helpful, too. Be grounded in your body, your environment, and let your thoughts go.

Also, stock up, but don’t hoard. The hope is the prediction of a Hudson Valley surge will be like the faulty weather report that forecasts a snow day, and we all wake up to a light dusting.



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