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How to prepare for changing education schedules. Part one of two-part series



4 of 8 unique ideas for making education at home easier

education, home, students, parents, schedules

This is part one of a two-part series.

Kids changing schedules make it harder to plan so that things can run smoothly. And what about planning for your time, whether you are working remotely or not. We have come up with some simple solutions that will help the kids and yourself as well.

1. Create homework caddies

Some of your kid’s schedules require days at home and, for some, a few days at school. So, there will be a lot of juggling going on.

Also, depending on what electronics you have at home for your kids, you may have to develop a shareable time schedule. My suggestion for all this chaos is to create separate homework caddies for each child. Something simple that they can organize and carry from room-to-room at home or in your backyard. It can include separators for supplies like paper, pencils, markers, glue, scissors, and erasers. These caddies make is easy to let each child create their own caddie design with the tools they need.

2. Develop a specific homework area

Create a place in your home or apartment where ‘school’ happens. Give them a separate space where they can work without interruption or distraction.

Read how Lauren Magree, of Guidecraft in Tuxedo, transformed her home to school her three children. She is not only a mom, but also the director of architecture and environmental design for Guidecraft.


3. Organize the cables

Where are my ear plugs? Or my extension cords? My battery charger?

It is easy to become frazzled when an online class is about to happen, and you are still searching for those ear plugs that work best for you. Consider using one of those homework caddies we suggested above, exclusively for the wired ‘stuff.’ Or include cords in each of the homework caddies your kids' created. Maybe you have a spot for a peg board that you can hang containers for your cords. Choose what works best for you. But do it before you go crazy looking for a battery charger.

4. Make freezer sandwiches

I remember learning from others who were dieting how great frozen chocolate cake tastes. But I never learned about freezing sandwiches.

I found the great article from the University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Food resources about best techniques for creating frozen sandwiches. They even offer a pdf of the article that you can download.

Did you know that peanut butter and jelly, and tuna make the best freezer sandwiches? Have a blast and let the kids create their own freezer foods for lunch.

Want more ideas? Chick here.



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