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Putting motherhood on your resume



New campaign to address growing female recession

Putting motherhood on your resume

An unprecedented 1.1 million women left the labor force during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This initiative aims to support moms who want to return to work and empower working moms to make motherhood more visible in the workplace.

Motherhood is a training ground for leadership. The loss of working mothers from the paid workforce makes the U.S. economy less competitive and families less prosperous, leading to worse outcomes for households over the long term. That's why HeyMama, the nation's largest and fastest-growing online community of entrepreneurial and working moms, is bringing back its Motherhood on the Resume® initiative, which urges moms to add "mother" to their resumes to underscore the value mothers bring to organizations and the workforce. 

"Last year, more than 1,000 women added 'motherhood' to their resumes, and while awareness has been raised, we are still seeing and hearing mothers in our community speak of increased stress and emotional distress," said Erika Feldhus, CEO of HeyMama. "Of the women who stopped working during the pandemic, 82% could not afford to be out of work. The time is now to tear down the cultural bias against mothers that's impacting their careers and recognize the strengths moms bring to their professional lives because of parenthood."

On May 17, 2022, HeyMama kicked off its Motherhood on the Resume® campaign with a virtual event to raise awareness of the historical and current disparities working moms face and to change the way working moms are viewed in the workplace. Over the course of the event, participants can attend interactive workshops and panels designed to provide inspiration and support for working mothers and moms who want to return to work.

"The income penalty for moms taking a break from work is 15% per child under the age of 5, and for Black and Indigenous women, it is nearly 20%," said Amri Kibbler, co-founder and chief community officer at HeyMama. "The unprecedented departure of women from the labor force over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic could set women back financially for decades. The Motherhood on the Resume® campaign has never been more necessary. It's imperative that employers and colleagues recognize the skills we bring to the table because we are mothers, not in spite of it."

Reaching more than 350,000 mothers in all 50 states, HeyMama is redefining the way working motherhood is valued. Learn more about HeyMama and their events.  

This year's sponsors of HeyMama's Motherhood on the Resume® include Elvie, Evereve, PowerToFly and MullenLowe.

HeyMama is a membership-based professional networking group for moms that connects mothers who are growing careers and families. The juggle is real, and we're here to provide you with a community of women and experiences to propel you forward. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.




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