ME TIME: Just for Women



6 beauty and fitness insider tips

Me Time Just for Women

1. Take a whiff …
Chef, chauffeur, nurse, tutor - a mother's job is never really done, which can be quite stressful. Aromatherapy can help improve your mood. Decorating your space with lavender reduces stress, as it releases a soothing scent that can actually lower heart rate and blood pressure. Bath and Body Works' aromatherapy collection - with its assortment of scrubs, mists, lotions, and shower gels - have the ability to energize, revitalize or even induce sleep. $6.50 - $20 at bathandbodyworks.com (search "aromatherapy").  

2. Got a minute – or 7?
Waking up an extra 15-20 minutes before your children can make all the difference in how the day flows - if you use the time to get the blood circulating with a little exercise. According to New York Times blogger Gretchen Reynolds, the 7 Minute Workout - a free exercise app with 30 seconds for rest breaks in between each segment - is more than worth a try. Because this routine is both short and intense, it's beneficial in boosting metabolism and fighting weight gain. Available in both the Apple App Store and Google Play. 

READ MORE: Finding "me" time after baby

3. Hydration is queen!
Our water drinking habits are extremely vital to our overall health. Unfortunately, the lack of flavor in water often turns people away from getting their proper H2O intake. Thankfully, fruit-infused water has come to lend us a tasty hand! Make your own by slicing fruits or veggies of your choice, placing them inside your water bottle, and letting them soak for up to two hours at room temperature or in the fridge overnight. Dailyburn.com has an awesome list of recipes for you to try out, including strawberries and mint leaves or oranges and blueberries. Setting small goals - like finishing the 64oz bottle you fill in the morning before you go to bed each day or having one bottle of water for every non-water beverage - can also help you get the water your body needs. 

4. Skin is in
Do your skin care products seem like they just aren't doing any good? It turns out, your products may not be the problem - but your routine and consistency might be. According to Stylecaster.com blogger Aly Walansky, how you cleanse is just as important as what you use. To start, use a make-up remover, as it clears up the surface of our face. Grapefruit facial wipes are great for this first step as they also help fight acne ($5.99 at most area CVS and Rite- Aid stores). Cleansing should follow, using lukewarm water - as extreme temperatures can cause redness or other issues. Using a toner after washing makes for a deeper cleanse, as it snatches anything the first wash might have missed. And lastly, don't forget to moisturize! 

READ MORE: Raise your child with a healthy body image

5. Touch-up tips
Not every mom has time for a salon trip, but that doesn't mean your hair has to suffer. Try combing your hair from root to end to distribute your hair's natural oils before bed; Use a leave-in-conditioner after washing to improve your hair's texture; Use your blow dryer less often to avoid heat damage, gently toweling your hair dry first and blow dry using the lowest setting on cool as an alternative. And did you know that zig-zagging your parts instead of making them straight can camouflage roots? 

6. Nails, Nails, Nails!
Although we use our hands more so than anything, nail care isn't always on the top of the list of things-to-get-done. We know that keeping our fingernails dry and clean can prevent infections and bacteria growth, but the way you wash your hands is also important to the overall care of your nails. Using milky hand soaps are better than clear soaps, which tend to dry out the skin. To strengthen soft nails and improve cuticle health, soak fingertips and cuticles in warm olive oil. And don't forget the base coat! Using one before polishing protects nails from staining and makes for a beautiful longer lasting manicure. 

READ MORE: Tips for making new mommy friends

 

Brilah Harrisa is a freelance writer from Newburgh and a new contributor to Hudson Valley Parent.