How to keep the house neat with a resident toddler



Minimize the chaos with these simple ideas

toddlers, home, clean, how-to

Once kids start walking, it's pretty much impossible to stop them from strewing toys and other objects around the house while they're on the move. On the blog PopSugar.com, neat freak Laura Woods describes the tricks she found to stay sane in this messy period of childhood.

An abundance of small storage bins. Simplify cleanup by stationing a bin or two or three in each room your toddler tends to visit. A quick sweep through the room, tossing items into bins as you go, and relative order is restored. It works for her husband, too, says Woods, who put a bin in his office so she could drop off stuff he's left around the house but isn't quite ready to put away. The result has been more order and less nagging. And the bins are cute, with lids you can color-coordinate with the furniture and drapes. 

Occasional quick clean-ups. If you wait till the end of the day, when the whole house is topsy-turvy, you'll be too tired and overwhelmed to deal with the mess. A pass through each room, several times during the day, will help keep the clutter to a manageable level. It doesn't mean you to have to follow your toddler around and put away every dropped item, but spend a few minutes tidying every once in a while. We found some interesting information on five best cleaning tools for your home on tidy.com        

Kids can help. Maybe it won't work until you're nearing the end of the toddler phase, but at some point, your child will be able to help, and eventually, they'll be able to clean up all on their own, with a little training. Also cleaning up can be a game. Recently a mom on Facebook mentioned that they all sit down on the floor and she makes a game of sorting socks. Don't forget that kids like order too, although it's probably not clear at this early stage.

I found that Roxanne Ferber, the author of The Whatever Mom, a great source of tips for raising kids.

Flexibility. Even Woods has learned to tolerate a certain amount of disorder, especially when she reminds herself it's a sign that her child is having fun.




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