Hot Topics     Home and Family    

How to economize on groceries



With food prices on the rise, here are money-saving tips for shopping

money-saving tips for shopping


Disruptions in the supply chain, such as the illness-induced closing of meat-packing plants, has combined with high demand for products to raise prices at grocery stores around the country. It may take some planning on your part, but it is definitely worth it.

This is also a great time to get your kids involved in cooking. When you are planning your weekly menu, ask each of your children to pick a day they will cook. You can add their items to your list. I remember when I first started this my youngest was six. His first meal with pigs in a blanket. He cooked them frozen in the baker toaster we had. Plus, he added instant mac and cheese. Not the most nutritious meal but it started him on the road to being a good cook.  

Inventory your shelves. Take a look through your kitchen cabinets and make a list of foods you bought ages ago and never ate. I did this when the pandemic first started. It was amazing what outdated food I had on my shelves. Use recipe websites to find dishes that will use up those products.

Plan meals for sale items. Go through supermarket circulars and write up a week's menus based on items listed on sale, particularly if you're buying meat. I am not getting the circulars mailed to my home right now, so I have to make the effort to go online to shop specials. Consider your schedule as you plan, reserving quickly made or slow-cooker dishes for evenings when you'll have less time.

Stretch meat. With the cost of meat so high, you can make your meat purchases last longer by decreasing the amount you use in each dish and/or substituting beans or rice for a portion of the meat. Add veggies to your dish. During this season veggies are plentiful, especially at farm markets.

Eliminate meat. Complete protein is available from beans and grains, dairy products, and eggs. Consider either going meatless or serving a few vegetarian meals each week. Research has shown that most Americans eat about twice the amount protein they really need.

Pay attention to produce. Don't over-purchase fruits and vegetables that will go bad before you eat them. If you have lots, then consider chopping them and putting them in the freezer in meal size portions. Keeping a stock of frozen produce helps fill in any gaps if you didn't quite buy enough. Pre-chopped vegetables are tempting, but they cost extra, and it's not that hard to chop them yourself.

Try discount stores. We all get used to going to the same familiar stores, but there may be cheaper ones farther from your house. Consider stocking up on staples there occasionally to make the longer trip worthwhile.


Buy with discounts. Most stores have free apps with discounts offered. They tend to be more cost-effective than manufacturers' coupons.

Download a rebate app. Instead of a discount at the register, these apps offer rebates on specific products. Upload a photo of your receipt and receive a gift card or PayPal transfer once you've spent a specified amount.

Resist impulse buys. Clever marketing makes us targets for impulse buying of unneeded, expensive items, especially when the kids are along. If it's hard to stick to your shopping list, consider a delivery service.

Go with store brands. Taste tests show name brands are not necessarily better than the cheaper store brands.

Cut food waste. Buying to a menu will reduce having excess food on hand. Make sure everything gets consumed by planning a weekly leftover buffet or adding leftovers to school lunches. Rotate food in the fridge so older items are in front of newly purchased foods and maintain a fruit bowl on the counter.

Shop with a list. It is easier to use a prepared list rather then going up and down the isles to see what you need. I use Alexa for my shopping lists. Makes it easier to shop, and easier to restore items when they need replenishing.

Thanks to Parent Map for much of this information. They are a great parenting pub in Seattle, WA.



Other articles by HVP News Reporters


  • View eagles in Mongaup

    Mongaup Valley Wildlife Management Area designated a Bird Conservation Area

    Mongaup was designated a Bird Conservation Area because of its unique combination of habitats important to bird species. read more »
  • Hike Smart & Be Prepared

    Safety tips for getting out in the winter months

    NYS DEC offers tips to keep you and your family safe while enjoying the outdoors this winter. read more »
  • Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Homeschool Naturalist Program

    Adventure Awaits Students Ages 6-9

    The Hudson Highlands Nature Museum’s Homeschool Naturalist Program for children ages 6-9 has quickly become one of the Nature Museum’s most beloved programs. Originally created out of the needs of families undertaking distance/learning, the program has proved so popular it has remained in place by demand. read more »
  • 5 ways parents can get prepared for student loan repayments

    Tips to help you survive student loan payments

    If you’re a parent who took out a federal student loan for your child and you’ve been taking advantage of the payment freeze as part of the COVID-19 emergency relief, then things are about to change. Starting January 31, 2022, payments will resume and no further extensions are expected. read more »
  • STEAM learning toys for your little ones

    Young kids have fun while learning letters and numbers

    Edx Education teaches letters and numbers through hands-on play read more »
  • DCP offers tips to help New Yorkers stay safe and warm

    NYS Division of Consumer Protection warns New Yorkers of carbon monoxide and fire hazards during extreme cold weather

    The New York State Division of Consumer Protection today issued a consumer alert about the dangers of carbon monoxide and fire hazards in extreme cold weather. The winter months pose the most risk for these hazards—as the temperatures drop, consumers may turn to dangerous heating alternatives to stay warm. Propane heaters, generators, space heaters and/or outdoor grills all pose lethal risks of carbon monoxide poisoning and fire hazards when used improperly. read more »
  • New gardening series with Newburgh Free Library

    Learn about herbs, microgreens, seeds, planning and planting

    Newburgh Free Library has a new gardening series starting with NUFFI, or Newburgh Urban Farm and Food, starting in February! read more »
  • Get up to 4 free at-home Covid-19 tests for your family

    The Biden Administration to Begin Distributing At-Home, Rapid COVID-19 Tests

    The Biden Administration is Buying One Billion Tests to Give to Americans for Free; Online Ordering of a Half-Billion Tests Begins on January 19th; Builds on Significant Actions to Expand Testing Capacity and Increase Access to Free Testing read more »
  • New York’s Going Foam Free in 2022

    NYS is working to keep our environment safe

    In 2020, New York State adopted the nation's strongest statewide ban of expanded polystyrene, single-use foam food and beverage containers, and polystyrene loose fill packaging materials, commonly known as packing peanuts. read more »
  • Sherman Artists Open Studio – This Weekend!

    Painters, photographers, mixed media, jewelers, fused glass, and fabric artists will open their home studios

    This weekend is the very first Sherman Artists First Open Studio! Fifteen local Sherman artists are participating in the Sherman Open Studio Tour on Saturday and Sunday, December 4th and 5th, 2021, 10 am – 4 pm. Painters, photographers, mixed media, jewelers, fused glass, and fabric artists will open their home studios or participate in pop-up studios read more »