How does your diet change when you are pregnant?



Seven foods you should avoid or modify your intake

women, pregnant, food, recipes

Many of the listings we have included are probably common knowledge, but it is worth a review. And it serves as an introduction to four great recipes by Heidi Murkoff that are included in her just updated popular book What to Expect: Eating Well When You're Expecting, 2nd Edition


1. Meat (cold cuts, hot dogs, burgers and more)

Eating meat during pregnancy is safe, as long as it is cooked. No more rare burgers and steaks-if that's your thing.


2. Soft Cheeses

You may have heard to stay away from some cheeses if you are pregnant. But feta, Brie, Camembert and other soft cheeses are safe to eat as long as they are made from pasteurized milk


3. Eggs

Pregnant or not, eating raw or undercooked eggs can cause foodborne illness from Salmonella.


4. Fish

Many women have been scared away from eating fish during pregnancy due to the mercury content, but not all fish are created equal. In fact, certain types of fish are good for your baby's development. Avoid shark, swordfish, mackerel, tilefish and tuna steaks, which are high in mercury.


5. Sushi

Steer clear of sushi, smoked seafood and ceviche. Raw fish and shellfish could be contaminated with fish-borne parasites or Norovirus.


6. Coffee

It's recommended that during pregnancy you limit your caffeine intake to 200 mg daily (about 1.5 cups of coffee). Although, the research on caffeine consumption during pregnancy is conflicting.


7. Alcohol

According to information from The March of Dimes, no amount of alcohol is considered safe in pregnancy. Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with fetal alcohol syndrome, birth defects and neurodevelopment disorders. But, what about an occasional drink? The research on this isn't as clear.


Now is the good part. Below are some wonderful recipes. Healthy. Tangy. Tasty. Enjoyable.


Rosemary Lemon   Chicken

SERVES 4

A simple vinaigrette of fragrant fresh rosemary and tangy lemon brightens this super-simple chicken dish, making it perfect for a quick meal or leisurely dinner. Serve it hot the first night and serve the leftovers (if there are any) cold the next night, perhaps sliced over a salad. Or, make a tasty sandwich or wrap for lunch.

  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon drained capers
  • 1 teaspoon chopped garlic (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Juice of 1 medium-size lemon, plus 1 lemon, very thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon pine nuts
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (each 4 ounces)
  • Salt and black pepper

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Place the rosemary, capers, garlic, if using, olive oil, lemon juice, and pine nuts in a small bowl and stir to mix. Set aside.

3. Place the lemon slices in a single layer in a baking dish large enough to hold the chicken breasts in a single layer. Season the chicken breasts with a pinch each of salt and pepper, then place them on top of the lemon slices. Spoon about a tablespoon of the rosemary mixture over each chicken breast. Bake the chicken until it registers 165°F at its thickest part, 20 to 25 minutes.

NUTRITION INFO: 1 portion provides:
Protein: 1 serving
Omegas: some

 

Alfredo Light

SERVES 2

Craving a creamy Alfredo, but wish you could dig in without spooning up all that fat? This enlightened alternative to the uber-caloric classic may be your pasta dream come true. Add in steamed sugar snap peas, asparagus tips, peas, or any of your favorite greens for a veggie-forward meal, sautéed chicken strips or shrimp for a protein boost. Use chickpea pasta for protein plus-plus.

  • ¼ pound whole-grain or chickpea cavatappi (such as Banza)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced
  • (about 1 teaspoon, optional) 1¼ cups 2% milk
  • 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour 6 tablespoons cream cheese 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese

1Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add the cavatappi and cook according to the directions on the package.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, if using, and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Whisk together the milk and flour in a small bowl. Pour the milk mixture into the skillet; bring to a boil, and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 1 minute. Whisk in the cream cheese, salt, and pepper, stirring until the cream cheese melts. Reduce the heat to low and stir in the Pecorino.

NUTRITION INFO: 1 portion provides:
Protein: ½ serving
Calcium: 1 serving
Whole grains and legumes: 2 servings
Fat: 1 serving

  

Fig and Arugula Salad with Parmesan Shavings

SERVES 2

  • Fresh figs make this a very sexy salad.
  • Can’t get fresh figs? Use sliced dried figs instead.
  • 1 teaspoon minced shallot, minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard Salt
  • 8 fresh figs, cut in half vertically 4 cups (packed) arugula
  • Black pepper
  • ½ cup Parmesan cheese shavings (about 2 ounces; see the box on page 251)

1.   Place the shallot, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, mustard, and a pinch of salt in a large salad bowl and whisk to mix. Add the figs, toss to coat them evenly, and let them stand, covered with plastic wrap, for 20 minutes.

2.  Add the arugula to the figs and toss to mix. Season with salt and pepper to taste, then toss well. Divide the fig salad between 2 smaller salad bowls and top with the Parmesan shavings.

NUTRITION INFO: 1 portion provides:
Calcium: 1 serving
Vitamin C: 1 serving
Vitamin A: 2 servings
Fat: 1 serving
Omegas: some



Move Over,  Croutons

Crave a crunch on your salad? Think outside the crouton box to add these tasty toppings:

Parmesan Crisps: Preheat the oven to 325°F. Coat a baking sheet with olive oil cooking spray. Mound heaping tablespoons of freshly grated Parmesan cheese on the baking sheet. Using the back of a spoon, pat each mound into a 3-inch circle. Bake until the cheese is bubbling, 6 to 8 minutes. Let the crisps cool slightly, then use a spatula to transfer them to paper towels to finish cooling and crisping. Serve on top of any cheese-friendly salad. They also make a super soup-topper. Or just snack on them.

Crunchy Chickpeas: Preheat the oven to 375°F. Drain a can of chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and pat them dry thoroughly with paper towels. Spread the chickpeas out on a rimmed baking sheet, spray them with olive oil cooking spray, and sprinkle them with grated Parmesan cheese. Bake the chickpeas until crunchy, about 30 minutes. Use the chickpeas to top salads or soups or just enjoy them by the handful. Experiment with other yummy flavor combos: parmesan and garlic powder, paprika and cumin, lime juice and chili powder, even cinnamon and a sprinkle of sugar.

 

Peanut Butter, Banana, and Chocolate Smoothie

SERVES 1

What’s peanut butter without banana? And what’s either without chocolate? Stop questioning and start blending this match made in smoothie heaven. Add ice to make it thick enough to eat with a spoon—the perfect excuse for sprinkling salted peanuts and dark chocolate chips on top.

  • ½ cup frozen ripe banana slices (about 1 large banana)
  • ½ cup Greek vanilla yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

Combine the banana slices, peanut butter, and cocoa in a blender. Blend until combined and smooth. Serve immediately.

NUTRITION INFO: 1 portion provides:
Protein: ½ serving
Calcium: ½ serving
Other fruits and vegetables: 1 serving
Fat: 2 servings


Go Bananas

If there’s one thing you should always have on hand, it’s frozen ripe bananas. They’ll make your smoothie sweet, thick, and extra satisfying. Peel ripe bananas (the peels should be well-speckled, without a hint of green) and cut into thirds before storing them in a container or freezer bag. Another use for your frozen banana stash: Coat them in melted dark chocolate for a decadent treat.

Recipes are excerpted with permission from What to Expect: Eating Well When You're Expecting, 2nd Edition. By Heidi Murkoff. Workman Publishing © 2020



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