Power up with protein



5 protein rich foods for vegetarian diets

5 protein rich foods for vegetarian diets

Going vegetarian is great for the environment, why not keep mother nature happy by adopting Meatless Monday! Try to go an entire day without eating meat or any type of animal by-product like milk or cheese. Worried you’ll be hungry all day? No need to worry…  A vegetarian diet can be packed with protein!

Here are 5 protein rich staples for a vegetarian diet:

1. Legumes are an excellent source of protein. Just one cup of lentils has 18 grams of protein! Other legumes include beans and peas. Give legumes a try with this popular Vegan Chili recipe.

2. Soy milk is a great substitute for dairy. Whether you drink it straight, or you use it as an ingredient, it is a healthy source of protein, and it has a lower fat content than cow’s milk. Check out this recipe for Vegan Lemon Fettuccine Alfredo which uses soy milk. Soy milk boasts a whooping 22 grams of protein per serving!

3. Tempeh is another great soy product. Since its high in protein (20 grams per 4 ounce serving), it is often used as a meat substitute. Want to give Tempeh a try? Check out this Vegan Rueben sandwich recipe.

READ MORE: Local mom talks pros & cons of organic living

4. Spinach is very high in protein. Spinach also happens to be Popeye’s go-to protein punch. Another added bonus of spinach is that it has a low caloric value and is high in vitamins and minerals. Check out this Vegan Spinach and Mushroom Lasagna recipe for a new spin on an old favorite.

5. Nuts are also high in protein, and they’re perfect for between meal snacking. Eat them raw, roasted, or incorporate into your next meal. Why not whip up some homemade protein bars using nuts this weekend!


Madison Beckman is an editorial assistant at Hudson Valley Parent and a student at Mount Saint Mary College.



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