Hot Topics     Home and Family     Teen Health    

Five key tips to follow when turning the car keys over to your teen



The clearer parents are in establishing driving rule, the safer teen drivers will be

teens, driving, safety, rules

So, your teen is ready to drive solo. What to do about your own fears as a parent?

Boys Town in Nebraska has come out with a five key tips all parents should keep in mind as they hand over the keys to their young ones.

1. Know the law. Research rules specific to your location and your teen’s age. This includes curfew for new drivers, regulations about how many people can be in the car with a new driver, texting and talking on the phone while driving, etc. Make sure your teen can recite these back to you — and revisit them often. Be abundantly clear that driving is a privilege, not a right, and he or she will lose car privileges immediately for violating any driving or traffic laws.

2. Review what your teens should do in the event of an accident — regardless of who’s at fault. Print the procedure out and put a copy in the car. Make sure your kids know where the registration and insurance cards are in the vehicle they’re using. Role play what to say and do if they’re involved in an accident.

READ MORE: Download this teen driving contract that sets rules for teens and parents alike

3. Increase teens’ driving privileges slowly. Safe driving takes both skill and good judgment, which develop with practice over time. Let them have the keys for some short runs—to school, the grocery store, etc. As they gain confidence and experience driving on their own, you and your teens can decide together how and when to increase their driving days and ranges.

4. Consider installing a GPS tracker for the vehicles your teens are driving. Or at least their phones. This increases peace of mind for both you and your new drivers. You’ll know where they are, and they’ll know you can find them if they get lost, run out of fuel, or have an emergency.

5. Decide ahead of time on who pays for what. Will you provide them with a vehicle? Do they need to pay for their own gas or auto insurance? Kids take privileges more seriously when they have some skin in the game. Making them responsible for some of the costs of driving helps teach responsibility.

Review these rules for the road early and often. Then hug your teens and tell them you’re proud of their growing independence




Other articles by HVP News Reporters


  • 5 tips to keep your pets safe this Halloween

    Ensure Halloween is fun for every member of the family

    To help ensure Halloween is fun for every member of the family, take note of these safety tips from the experts at VCA Animal Hospitals. read more »
  • Pop up a sweet, kid-friendly treat

    This fun pizza swaps out classic crust for popcorn

    The next time your kids are begging for an indulgent snack after finishing chores or dessert following dinner, call them to the kitchen for a quick, delicious lesson. read more »
  • Inspiration Icons female superhero characters empower kids

    An original line of female superheroes

    Creator of The She Shift LLC brand launched an original line of female superheroes called Inspiration Icons to empower kids. read more »
  • 8 ways students can build a cultural identity

    A simple and fun opportunity for discovery

    Days spent in the classroom are often centered around language, reading, math, science and other traditional curriculum, but there’s another key subject students may learn about without even realizing it: themselves. read more »
  • Take the stress out of introducing solid foods to baby

    6 pediatrician-recommended tips

    Watching your baby learn and grow can provide some of the most rewarding moments in life, full of emotions from parents and babies alike. Some milestones are more stressful or frustrating than others and, during these moments of newness, seeking guidance from health care professionals can go a long way. read more »
  • Manage heart health for stronger brain health

    Lower your risk of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and dementia

    The same risk factors that contribute to making heart disease the leading cause of death worldwide also impact the rising global prevalence of brain disease, including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. read more »
  • 5 steps to properly manage blood pressure

    Control your risk for heart disease and stroke as well as other issues

    Nearly half of all American adults have high blood pressure, or hypertension, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of those, about 75% don’t have it under control, and many may not even realize they have it unless they experience other complications. read more »
  • Back-to-school could mean back to nicotine addiction for some teens

    The NYS Smokers' Quitline offers free resources to help teenagers and their parents on a journey to become nicotine-free

    With back-to-school season drawing near and COVID-19 protocols becoming less restrictive, teenagers will soon encounter more opportunities for socialization. This unfortunately could mean exposure to vape products, which often have high concentrations of nicotine and harm the still-developing brain. read more »
  • Centsible ways to teach kids healthy money habits

    It is imperative to secure your child's financial future

    In school, most kids only learn algebra, calculus, and trigonometry but not how to budget, save or invest. The older we get, the more responsibilities we have that make it challenging to focus on learning financial principles, which is why it is key to start teaching kids healthy money habits at a young age. read more »
  • 3 tips to boost your children's self-esteem this school year

    Be your kid's cheerleader

    While packing bags and backpacks for school, there’s one essential that may be overlooked: Children’s self-esteem. Although many children may feel confident and self-assured at home, they can feel differently in the classroom. When children have high self-esteem, they’re less likely to reflect negative feelings toward others. read more »