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Many Covid-19 cases can be treated at home



But be wary if you experience shortness of breath

COVID-19, family, care, sick, virus, breathing


Thousands of Hudson Valley residents are testing positive for Covid-19, as reported on county websites, with some showing symptoms, while others not. With a little preparation, and a list of supplies, many will be able to manage their symptoms at home. 

Here is what Dr. Pieter Cohen, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and an internist at the Cambridge Health Alliance, recommends:
  • thermometer
  • acetaminophen or ibuprofen  
  • rehydration drinks like Pedialyte 
  • medicines for cough and nausea 
  • humidifier to moisten the air in the home
A pulse oximeter, an electronic device that clips onto a patient’s finger to measure heart rate and oxygen saturation in his or her red blood cells, can be useful in assessing someone with lung disease, but not a necessity. However, if you do have one, according to YaleMedicine.com, and are checking your oxygen levels, it’s important to know that a level between 95 and 97% is considered normal by the American Lung Association. Anything below that would be a reason to call a doctor, and anything under 90% would be a reason to go to the emergency room. If you have never used an oximeter before, make sure to have a medical professional guide you through how to use, and help you understand the device. 

Keep a log of symptoms including when they started (also a way to keep track of any medicines you take and when you took them. Very helpful should you have to confer with your doctor.)

Have a friend or neighbor be on hand to pick up supplies should you not be able to go out if symptoms occur. Any deliveries should be left at the door.

Dr. Cohen says that most cases of Covid-19 can be managed at home. But if you develop trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion, an inability to wake or stay awake and/or bluish lips or face, seek emergency care.

Some people will have relatively mild symptoms at first and then become more seriously ill. These patients are likely to develop shortness of breath four to eight days after their first symptoms, and “that’s really where people should start paying attention,” says Dr. Cohen. If the shortness of breath worsens from day to day, that’s a sign to call your doctor. Less commonly, patients with low oxygen levels may experience dizziness or lightheadedness instead of shortness of breath, so keep an eye out for that too.

Click on the New York Times article for additional information.



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