Hot Topics     Home and Family    

Many Covid-19 cases can be treated at home



But be wary if you experience shortness of breath

COVID-19, family, care, sick, virus, breathing


Thousands of Hudson Valley residents are testing positive for Covid-19, as reported on county websites, with some showing symptoms, while others not. With a little preparation, and a list of supplies, many will be able to manage their symptoms at home. 

Here is what Dr. Pieter Cohen, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and an internist at the Cambridge Health Alliance, recommends:
  • thermometer
  • acetaminophen or ibuprofen  
  • rehydration drinks like Pedialyte 
  • medicines for cough and nausea 
  • humidifier to moisten the air in the home
A pulse oximeter, an electronic device that clips onto a patient’s finger to measure heart rate and oxygen saturation in his or her red blood cells, can be useful in assessing someone with lung disease, but not a necessity. However, if you do have one, according to YaleMedicine.com, and are checking your oxygen levels, it’s important to know that a level between 95 and 97% is considered normal by the American Lung Association. Anything below that would be a reason to call a doctor, and anything under 90% would be a reason to go to the emergency room. If you have never used an oximeter before, make sure to have a medical professional guide you through how to use, and help you understand the device. 

Keep a log of symptoms including when they started (also a way to keep track of any medicines you take and when you took them. Very helpful should you have to confer with your doctor.)

Have a friend or neighbor be on hand to pick up supplies should you not be able to go out if symptoms occur. Any deliveries should be left at the door.

Dr. Cohen says that most cases of Covid-19 can be managed at home. But if you develop trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion, an inability to wake or stay awake and/or bluish lips or face, seek emergency care.

Some people will have relatively mild symptoms at first and then become more seriously ill. These patients are likely to develop shortness of breath four to eight days after their first symptoms, and “that’s really where people should start paying attention,” says Dr. Cohen. If the shortness of breath worsens from day to day, that’s a sign to call your doctor. Less commonly, patients with low oxygen levels may experience dizziness or lightheadedness instead of shortness of breath, so keep an eye out for that too.

Click on the New York Times article for additional information.



Other articles by HVP News Reporters


  • Back-to-school could mean back to nicotine addiction for some teens

    The NYS Smokers' Quitline offers free resources to help teenagers and their parents on a journey to become nicotine-free

    With back-to-school season drawing near and COVID-19 protocols becoming less restrictive, teenagers will soon encounter more opportunities for socialization. This unfortunately could mean exposure to vape products, which often have high concentrations of nicotine and harm the still-developing brain. read more »
  • Centsible ways to teach kids healthy money habits

    It is imperative to secure your child's financial future

    In school, most kids only learn algebra, calculus, and trigonometry but not how to budget, save or invest. The older we get, the more responsibilities we have that make it challenging to focus on learning financial principles, which is why it is key to start teaching kids healthy money habits at a young age. read more »
  • 3 tips to boost your children's self-esteem this school year

    Be your kid's cheerleader

    While packing bags and backpacks for school, there’s one essential that may be overlooked: Children’s self-esteem. Although many children may feel confident and self-assured at home, they can feel differently in the classroom. When children have high self-esteem, they’re less likely to reflect negative feelings toward others. read more »
  • Breathe easy

    What to look for and how to make your home's air better

    According to the 2021 American Time Use Survey, 38% of employed people did some or all of their work from home. That means better indoor air quality at home is as important as ever. read more »
  • Simple, sweet energy bites

    Keep your family's energy level up

    Having enough energy and fuel to make it through a long day can be challenging. No matter if you’re a stay-at-home parent, corporate worker or small business owner, having a high energy level that lasts throughout the day is important for both you and those around you. read more »
  • Get smart about sustainability

    Tips for teaching kids earth-friendly habits

    For many parents, their interest in sustainability and earth-friendly living is driven by a desire to create a better world for their children. Taking personal action and responsibility are part of the solution but teaching the next generation to be environmentally conscious is an important part of the equation, too. read more »
  • A homemade crunchy mushroom wrap to save your grocery budget

    Sneak something healthy into your family's meal

    If the prices of your favorite ingredients have you dreading the next trip to the grocery store, finding ways to stretch your budget can help you feel better at the checkout counter. read more »
  • 6 tips for pet parents

    How to be environmentally friendly with your fur babies

    For many people, “going green” means walking rather than driving, ditching single-use plastics, and conserving energy. To go above and beyond, pet parents can follow additional measures that aid the planet while supporting their furry friends. read more »
  • Minimize the risk of child identity theft

    NYS Division of Consumer Protection offers advice

    Child Identity Theft is a growing problem. According to recent data from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), identity theft for those under 19 years old grew 60% in three years. read more »
  • Cyberbullying in the US increased by 10% in 2 years

    How you can protect your kids

    As many children are coming back to school, experts recommend to parents how to keep them safe online read more »