Healthy Kids    

Better-for-you brownies with a sweet, simple swap



Up the nutrition value by sneaking in some fruit

Better-for-you brownies with a sweet, simple swap

The next time a healthy conscience keeps you from enjoying that sweet treat you’re craving, remember that making healthy swaps is all it takes to make those favorite desserts a little better for you.

These Vegan Brownies, for example, are perfect for chocolate lovers looking for a sweet they can enjoy without ditching healthy eating habits. By using versatile California Prunes as a natural sweetener, you can replace processed sugar, fats and eggs in all kinds of recipes. Plus, prunes also add nutrients important for bone and gut health to your everyday diet.

READ MORE: Healthy no-bake home cookin’ with the kids

With copper that aids in bone structure along with boron and polyphenols that help with the regulation of bone building and bone breakdown, you can feel good enjoying your family’s favorites while staying on track with health goals. Prunes are also known as a “good gut food,” meaning a single serving (4-5 prunes) can help support a healthy microbiome. High in vitamin K, they can also help improve calcium balance and promote bone mineralization.

Visit californiaprunes.org to find more delicious, better-for-you desserts.

Watch video to see how to make this recipe!


Vegan Brownies

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
Servings: 9

Prune Puree:

  • 16 ounces pitted California prunes
  • 1/2 cup hot water
Brownies:
  • nonstick cooking spray
  • 6 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 1/2 cup California extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups light brown sugar
  • 10 ounces California prune puree
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • flaky sea salt, for garnish
  1. To make prune puree: In blender, combine prunes and water. Pulse to combine then blend until smooth, pourable consistency forms, scraping sides, if necessary.

  2. Store puree in airtight container in fridge up to 4 weeks.

  3. To make brownies: Preheat oven to 350 F. Line 9-by-9-inch baking pan with parchment paper then lightly grease with nonstick cooking spray.

  4. Using double boiler, melt chocolate and olive oil. Whisk in sugar and prune puree; mix until dissolved.

  5. Into large bowl, sift flour, baking powder and cocoa powder. Gently fold in chocolate and prune mixture then add vanilla.

  6. Spread batter in prepared pan, sprinkle with flaky sea salt and bake 20-25 minutes, or until top starts to look dry and brownies are just beginning to pull away from sides of pan.

  7. Cool in pan. Remove then cut brownies into 3-inch squares.
(Family Features)


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