Hot Topics     Home and Family     Family Fun    

A time to sow



Hudson Valley Seed Company is ready for spring

Hudson Valley Seed Company is ready for spring planting


While the pandemic has upset many aspects of Hudson Valley life, it has not affected our rich soil. Last spring, when lockdown first commenced, many families – including mine – either began gardens, or invested more deeply in the process of planting, tending, and sowing. Being suddenly unable to travel made us like the farming communities of old, hardscrabble country folk who spent much more time at home, making use of nature’s gifts. 

As 2020 played out, multiple scientific studies asserted what people of the soil have always known: getting outside, and getting your hands dirty in a garden, is excellent medicine for both body and mind.

These revelations were not news to Accord-based Hudson Valley Seed Company. For years, they’ve been there to help folks both local and otherwise get to know the land and the flora. They’ve long known seeds can ultimately tell a positive, nurturing story amid a swirl of bad news. And their seeds are not just any seeds. 

According to their website, “Every seed in our catalog is open pollinated, many are heirloom and organic, and they are never GMO. We were one of the first companies to sign the Open Source Seed Initiative and we will remain committed to our values of sustainability to the last.”

Undeterred by continued upheaval of 2020, the Hudson Valley Seed Company is readying for spring 2021, continuing a community-based mission of “growing organically, sourcing locally and sustainably, and preserving crop diversity by selecting unique, rare, and hard-to-find varieties.”

READ MORE: Planting seeds: mindfulness for kids

Hudson Valley Seed Company’s story began humbly in 2004, when co-founder Ken Greene was working as a librarian at the Gardiner Public Library. Interested in the local food movement, he realized most folks know little of the seeds that grow their food, so he started the country's first seed library program.

The connection between seeds and storytelling soon became apparent. HVSC likens a seed to “a time capsule telling tales of the plants, crops, and people that came before us.”

Greene realized that “working with seeds was a way to work with issues concerning the environment, health, history, culture, and more.” He realized he could help people of all ages understand how they are like seeds – connected to all that came before, and potentially impactful on the as-yet-unseen future.

Ken and partner Doug Muller’s seed collection was initially contained in an oak dresser. Over the years, they’ve morphed from a seed library to a proper seed company, expanding to a five-acre organic farm and a two-story house. In 2009, they hired 14 artists to design their seed packs. This became Art Packs, a continuing tradition. Art Packs offer gardeners beautiful packaging while also supporting artists.

As the mainstream slowly but steadily embraces the values of biodiversity, local food production, and sustainability, Hudson Valley Seed Company offers a chance for locals to see what it all looks like up close and personal, and to dig in.



Other articles by HVP News Reporters


  • Pandemic parenting made easier

    3 simple tips to help you get through the homestretch

    At the risk of oversimplifying multi-faceted problems, corporate psychologist Kate Snowise boils it down to three tips that can solve a multitude of parenting ills. read more »
  • s-NO-w Day

    The world won't come to a halt if you spend the snow day with your kids

    Peter Shankman offers some great advice on what to do with that surprise snow day read more »
  • Three books to encourage healthy outdoor play

    Great ideas to help kids get outside

    A fun journey with a grandma and granddaughter, nature play and how to create areas to connect children with the natural world read more »
  • Mindfulness for parents

    Keep it together by letting go

    Even when there’s no pandemic, keeping yourself together for your family can be a challenge. With the added stresses of Covid, it may be time to give mindfulness a try. read more »
  • Words to soothe the angry child

    The right phrase can make all the difference

    Pandemic or no, children can get really mad, really fast. The folks at motherly offer some strategic phrases that can help de-escalate any number of situations, from toddler-hood to the teen years. It’s never too early to teach anger management. read more »
  • Tips to keep your teen active in lockdown

    Physical activity is more crucial than ever

    Wintertime isolation during Covid makes physical activity even more of a challenge, but it’s important for everyone, especially teens, to get the blood flowing, here are some helpful tips. read more »
  • Mental Health help is just a phone call away

    List of mental health centers and phone numbers

    The pandemic has affected the mental health of millions of Americans. You are not alone and help can be had by making a phone call read more »
  • 5 tips to help regulate your emotions

    Modeling your stress response for your kids is important

    The kids are always watching, especially in these stressful times, when most are home much more than ever. When the inevitable stressful situation arises, here are some tips on how to manage emotions constructively. read more »
  • Tips for teaching kids mindfulness

    It’s never too early or too late to start

    The prospect of teaching mindfulness techniques to children can be daunting. Meggie Seaver at Real Simple offers tips to help make it easy. read more »
  • Tips for balancing working from home with remote learning

    A few tweaks in your routine will do wonders

    Some experts – including parents – offer some helpful “hacks” to help you achieve work/parenting balance read more »