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Baby Bump Photos



10 fun ways to use photos to track your baby bump

Pregnancy is such an important and magical time in a mom’s life. Those nine months are jam-packed with details like doctor appointments, baby showers, morning sickness and NESTING!  One special way to help you cherish every moment of your pregnancy is to take a weekly photo your growing bump.

Here are 10 tips to take the best weekly bump photos:

1.Take a picture in front of a chalkboard each week. You can include a countdown and other important updates like holidays and events.

2. Take pictures with props, such as fruit, to demonstrate how big the baby is each week.

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3. Take your weekly photo in the same outfit to show how your body is changing.

4. Pose in front of the same door or other distinguishing landmark. It helps to distinguish the different weeks and show your progress.

5. Buy or make a shirt with a calendar countdown. Cross off each week before you pose for the picture.

6. Show others how you see your bump the most, from the top looking down. You can watch as each week, your feet become less and less visible.

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7. Find a photo of your mother when she was pregnant with you, and start a new family tradition by recreating the photo.

8. You can include other family members, like your partner or older siblings, in the pictures to make them more customized for your family.

9. Each week, mark off how large the bump is on the back of a tape measure. At the end, you will have all the measurements recorded on a small keepsake.

10. At the end of your pregnancy, make a collage of all the photos that you took along the way, creating one cumulative photo. You could also make a video montage of all the pictures that you can post online, or keep for yourself.

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Madison Beckman is a student at Mount Saint Mary College and is an editorial intern at Hudson Valley Parent.